Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics-WHO | Mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Testing for HIV in pregnancy enables measures to be taken to reduce the risk of mother-tochild transmission and for the woman to be offered treatment and psychosocial support. Testing for HIV in pregnancy enables measures to be taken to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission and for the woman to be offered treatment and psychosocial support. Human immunodeficiency virus HIV is a blood-borne infection that is initially asymptomatic but involves gradual compromise of immune function, eventually leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome AIDS. Undiagnosed HIV infection during pregnancy has serious implications for the health of both the woman and her child. Globally, most children with HIV acquire infection through mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, during birth or through breastfeeding Volmink et al

Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics

Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics

Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics

Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics

Timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. If the test results are positive, treatment should continue. Views Read Edit View history. August An extension of multivariable analysis that is used to model two or more outcomes at the same time. If your partner is not infected with HIV, in addition to using condoms, there are some drugs that partners can Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics that may decrease their risk of becoming infected. In the opt-in model, women are counseled on HIV testing and elect to receive the test by signing a consent form.

Girls withnice pussy. Preventing Perinatal HIV Transmission

Table 1 Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics of HIV-negative women who were followed up and lost to follow-up. National Center for Biotechnology Hiv infection in pregnancy statisticsU. Trop Med Oregnancy Health. Interventions that focus Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics gender equality and sexual rights particularly on the delay of first ztatistics intercourse are critical. The instrument was modified to be culturally appropriate. Opt-out prenatal HIV testing means that a pregnant woman is told she will be given an HIV test as part of routine prenatal care unless she opts out—that is, chooses not to have the test. Table 2 Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics of women associated with HIV incidence over two years of follow-up. Pediatr Infect Dis J ;36 1 In general, pregnant women with HIV can use the same HIV regimens recommended for non-pregnant adults— unless the risk of any known side effects to a pregnant woman or her baby outweighs the benefits of a regimen. Ver Mas Recursos. Age difference with main Gvax prostate cancer was calculated by subtracting the age of the participant from her partner's age. The adolescent fertility rate childbirth at age 15—19 was 65 births per women [ 67 ]. Most adolescents characterized their pregnancies as unplanned [ 9 ]. Practice of feeding premasticated food to infants: a Teens put in diapers pic risk factor for HIV transmission. Afr J Reprod Health.

HIV enters the bloodstream by way of body fluids, such as blood or semen.

  • Prevalence is the number of people who have HIV infection at a given time, such as at the end of a given year.
  • Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy.
  • Of these,
  • Most HIV medicines are safe to use during pregnancy.
  • Perinatal HIV transmission also known as mother-to-child transmission can happen at any time during pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding.
  • .

The transmission of HIV from a HIV-positive mother to her child during pregnancy, labour, delivery or breastfeeding is called mother-to-child transmission. These interventions primarily involve antiretroviral treatment for the mother and a short course of antiretroviral drugs for the baby. They also include measures to prevent HIV acquisition in the pregnant woman and appropriate breastfeeding practices. Global plan towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children and keeping their mothers alive.

Health Topics. World Health Statistics. About Us. Skip to main content. More about mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Global plan towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children and keeping their mothers alive progress report. View all publications on mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

For babies with HIV, starting treatment early is important because the disease can progress more quickly in children than adults. Virgin Islands. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Data include only persons born in the United States 50 states and District of Columbia. Because of delays in reporting of deaths, prevalence data are only available through the end of

Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics

Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics. The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic

People with HIV who are aware of their status, take ART daily as prescribed, and get and keep an undetectable viral load can live long, healthy lives and have effectively no risk of sexually transmitting HIV to their HIV-negative partners. HIV Care Continuum —The term HIV care continuum refers to the sequence of steps a person with HIV takes from diagnosis through receiving treatment until his or her viral load is suppressed to undetectable levels. Each step in the continuum is marked by an assessment of the number of people who have reached that stage.

The stages are: being diagnosed with HIV; being linked to medical care; starting ART; adhering to the treatment regimen; and, finally, having HIV suppressed to undetectable levels in the blood.

In , around , people died from AIDS-related illnesses worldwide, compared to 1. In , there were Despite advances in our scientific understanding of HIV and its prevention and treatment as well as years of significant effort by the global health community and leading government and civil society organizations, too many people with HIV or at risk for HIV still do not have access to prevention, care, and treatment, and there is still no cure.

Further, the HIV epidemic not only affects the health of individuals, it also impacts households, communities, and the development and economic growth of nations.

Many of the countries hardest hit by HIV also suffer from other infectious diseases, food insecurity, and other serious problems. Despite these challenges, there have been successes and promising signs. New global efforts have been mounted to address the epidemic, particularly in the last decade.

The number of people newly infected with HIV has declined over the years. In addition, the number of people with HIV receiving treatment in resource-poor countries has dramatically increased in the past decade and dramatic progress has been made in preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV and keeping mothers alive. The U. NIH is engaged in research around the globe to understand, diagnose, treat, and prevent HIV infection and its many associated conditions, and to find a cure.

Read more about the U. Content Source: HIV. Many Federal agencies have developed public awareness and education campaigns to address HIV prevention, treatment, care, and research.

Also included is information about campaigns related to the prevention and diagnosis of hepatitis B and C. Follow-up was undertaken nationwide to trace young people who had migrated away from the study area over the period of the study; women were successfully traced and provided data for the HIV incidence analyses.

Detailed information about all assessments, study recruitment, access and ethical issues, including support for participants testing HIV positive, is published elsewhere [ 21 ]. Ethical clearance for the study was granted by the University of Pretoria ethics committee and the Emory University institutional review board. Written consent was obtained when participants were recruited into the study.

Assessments at baseline, 12 months and 24 months consisted of blood tests for HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2 HSV2 and an interview to ascertain socio-demographic and partner characteristics and sexual risk behaviour. All questionnaires were administered by trained female interviewers.

We used data to assess the effects of early age 15 and younger and later age 16—19 adolescent pregnancies on incidence of HIV infection at two years of follow-up. For this longitudinal analysis, we excluded women who had HIV infection at baseline, women with missing data, and those who were lost to follow-up at 12 months and 24 months.

HIV serostatus at baseline was assessed by the use of two rapid tests. Towards the end of the second round of interviews, collection of blood as dried spots was introduced for some participants to ease logistics and to improve acceptability. In the third round of interviews, most blood was obtained as dried spots.

Detailed data were collected from all participants on socio-demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and pregnancy history at each of three time points. The exposure of interest was a categorical variable based on age at first pregnancy, measured at the baseline assessment. Women were asked if they had ever been pregnant and, if so, in which year they first became pregnant.

Age at first pregnancy was calculated by subtracting the date of birth from the date of first pregnancy. Three categories were created: early adolescent pregnancy, which included young women who experienced a first pregnancy at age 15 years or younger; later adolescent pregnancy, which included those who experienced their first pregnancy at age 16 to 19 years; and the referent group consisted of women who did not report an adolescent pregnancy.

Socio-demographic characteristics included age and years of schooling completed. Educational attainment was dichotomized into those who had completed more than 10 years of schooling and those who had 10 years of schooling or less at baseline.

Socio-economic status was assessed by the use of a scale that encompassed household goods ownership, food and cash scarcity. Items on sexual partners included the age of the most recent partner.

Age difference with main partner was calculated by subtracting the age of the participant from her partner's age. The age difference was dichotomized into an age difference of less than four years or four years or more. A modified version of the short form of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was used [ 21 , 22 ]. It included five dimensions of trauma: emotional neglect, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse and sexual abuse. Participants were asked whether—before the age of 18—they had experienced each act never, sometimes, often, or very often.

The Cronbach's alpha for the scale was 0. Items on sexual behaviour included partner numbers, condom use and age at first sex. Three questions established past year partner numbers of main boyfriends, khwapheni hidden partners concurrent with main partners , and men with whom the participant had sex only once [ 21 ]. Condom use was measured by an item that asked participants whether they always, sometimes, seldom, or never used a condom. Transactional sex with a casual partner was measured based on questions asking about sex motivated by expectations of receiving one of a range of items [ 23 ].

Experience of intimate partner violence was measured by the World Health Organization WHO violence against women instrument [ 24 ]. The instrument was modified to be culturally appropriate. The instrument included five items measuring single and multiple occurrences of physical abuse occurring within the last 12 months and over a woman's lifetime, and four items measuring single and multiple occurrences of sexual abuse within the past 12 months and over a woman's lifetime.

Because the original study was a stratified, two-stage survey with villages sampled from predefined strata based on geographical characteristics and participants clustered within villages, initial data analyses were carried out in Stata 10 using the survey procedures Stata Corp. These procedures allowed us to account for the lack of independence in the observations non-zero, positive intra-cluster correlation ICC because of the sampling design.

Descriptive statistics were first calculated for all variables; and two-way associations were determined between incident HIV infection and early and later adolescent pregnancy, childhood trauma, age at first sex, HSV, educational attainment, age and socio-economic status. For each participant, we calculated the person years of exposure as the time from baseline to the last negative HIV result if the person remained negative, or as the total time between any negative tests as well as half the time between the last negative and first positive HIV test results.

Random effects Poisson models were built to test the hypothesis that adolescent pregnancies occurring at the age of 15 years or younger, or between 16 and 19 years of age, predicted incident HIV infection measured at follow-up.

Each model included variables for participation in the Stepping Stones study treatment arm, stratum and person years of exposure. We assessed the models for confounding by age, socio-economic status, education, child sexual, physical and emotional abuse, childhood emotional neglect, HSV status at baseline and age at first sex.

We tested goodness of fit by using the Poisson test. We confirmed the findings of associations for the outcome variable by modelling survival time under observation with a Weibull model, with the same set of other variables included. To investigate whether results were robust to missing data, we undertook a sensitivity analysis with inverse probability weighting. The results suggest that the potential impact of missing data is minimal.

Of the women who were enrolled in the trial, were excluded from this analysis. Women lost to follow-up Table 1 were older and were more likely to have had a boyfriend and sex at baseline. The mean age of the young women retained in the cohort was At baseline, By the end of the approximately two years of follow-up, Fifty-two young women had no sexual intercourse before the end of the study period. The median time between early adolescent pregnancy and the baseline assessment was six years with a range from three to eleven years.

Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics of HIV-negative women who were followed up and lost to follow-up. The HIV incidence among the cohort of young women was 6.

As shown in Table 2 , there were no significant differences in age, education, or socio-economic status between those women who acquired HIV and those who did not. Young women who experienced childhood adversity, particularly sexual and emotional abuse, were more likely to acquire HIV.

A significantly greater proportion of women who acquired HIV, compared to those who did not, tested positive for HSV2 at baseline. Women who acquired HIV were younger when they first had sexual intercourse Two hundred and fifty-one young women Of these, 43 were aged 15 or younger when they had a pregnancy.

Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics of women associated with HIV incidence over two years of follow-up. Women who experienced a later adolescent pregnancy aged 16—18 years did not have an increased risk of incident HIV compared with the young women who did not have an adolescent pregnancy. In the model, we adjusted for childhood trauma, age at first sex, HSV2, study design, educational attainment, socio-economic status and age. Controlled for Stepping Stones study, age, socio-economic status, education, child sexual abuse, child emotional abuse, child physical abuse, emotional neglect, HSV, age at first sex.

Given the strong link between an early adolescent pregnancy and subsequent HIV infection, we explored whether adolescents who experienced an early pregnancy had an increased risk of a range of behavioural factors Table 4 and whether the young women had partners with characteristics that placed them at a differential risk of acquiring HIV Table 5.

Women who had experienced an early adolescent pregnancy had increased odds of having four or more sexual partners in their lifetime. Although marginally significant, they also experienced more physical and sexual violence than women who had a later adolescent pregnancy or did not have a pregnancy.

A greater proportion of women who had an early adolescent pregnancy reported always using a condom at the baseline assessment than those women who experienced a later adolescent pregnancy Women who had experienced an early adolescent pregnancy had partners at the start of the study who were much older four or more years older. However, fewer of these women reported that their partners were in concurrent relationships than those women who had a later adolescent pregnancy.

Note: Teenage pregnancy in this exploratory analysis is the exposure of interest and the sexual risk behaviours are the outcomes. Results support the hypothesis that young women who have an early, but not later, adolescent pregnancy are more likely to subsequently become HIV infected.

The study provides strong evidence of the temporal aspect of this finding with pregnancies occurring years before the incident HIV infection thus ruling out the possibility that HIV infection occurred simultaneously or preceded the early pregnancies. This finding suggests that behavioural factors may be important in the increased risk of incident HIV, adding to the results of earlier studies that suggest that higher transmission in pregnancy is biological and the result of hormonal changes during pregnancy [ 3 ].

Early adolescent pregnancy was associated with higher lifetime partner numbers and subsequently having a partner who was four or more years older. Although this analysis was exploratory, these findings suggest that early adolescent pregnancies were followed by different risk behaviour than that among young women who had a pregnancy between the ages of 16 and 18 years and the younger adolescents. Further research is required to investigate the pathways through which early adolescent pregnancy increases the risk of subsequent HIV infection.

This paper builds on previous work on this data set. Jewkes and colleagues found that child sexual abuse increased the risk of subsequent HIV infection among the same group of young women [ 26 ]. In our analysis, we adjusted for different dimensions of childhood trauma. Adolescents reporting an early pregnancy at the age of 15 or younger would all, by legal definition, have experienced child sexual abuse. However, qualitative data from the participants in this study indicated that, although some of these early relationships were experienced as abusive, others were described as more equitable [ 27 ].

Behavioural interventions are common that address adolescent sexual risk behaviour and that aim to reduce unwanted pregnancies and HIV infection [ 28 — 32 ]. Some studies have investigated adolescent pregnancy and HIV as co-occurring outcomes, and prevention interventions have focused on the simultaneous prevention of both [ 33 , 34 ].

This study suggests the importance of preventing early adolescent pregnancy as related to subsequent HIV infection. Interventions that focus on gender equality and sexual rights particularly on the delay of first sexual intercourse are critical. The South African Children's Act 38 of ensures confidentiality for young women under the age of 18 who obtain condoms, contraceptives, or contraceptive advice.

Despite the law, adolescents report experiencing judgemental attitudes from health care providers when they access contraceptive services [ 35 ]. They also are afraid that health care providers will not maintain confidentiality and will discuss their contraceptive use with parents or relatives. Another paper from this data set found that very few adolescents who reported having had sexual intercourse accessed contraceptives prior to having an adolescent pregnancy and that most contraceptive use by adolescents followed a pregnancy [ 36 ].

This study has several limitations. It is based on the analysis of data from a cohort of volunteers in an HIV prevention trial, and this may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Although retention of study participants was high, some were lost to follow-up, and there were a few significant differences in the socio-demographic characteristics. We tested for robustness to missing data, and our results suggested that the potential effect was small. Pregnancies were self-reported, and it is possible that pregnancies that were terminated or miscarried were under-reported. Significant strengths of the study include the use of prospectively collected data, HIV testing protocol, and the coherence and strength of our findings across different modelling procedures.

This study found that women who experienced an early adolescent pregnancy had an increased incidence of HIV infection that occurred two or more years afterwards. Early adolescent pregnancies may lead to sexual risk behaviours such as higher partner numbers and a greater age difference with partners rather than only a biological explanation of hormonal changes during pregnancy. There is a need to address adolescent pregnancy not only as a health outcome but as a risk factor for HIV infection.

Thus, preventing early adolescent pregnancies is important in a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy in countries with high HIV prevalence, such as South Africa. We thank all the members of the Stepping Stones study team and members of the community advisory board and data safety and monitoring board.

Wrote the first draft of the manuscript: NJC. Participated in the design of the study, the data collection, and contributed to the manuscript draft: NJS, MN.

RKJ was the Principal Investigator and led the design of the research and wrote the grant proposal. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Published online Mar Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Introduction Adolescents having unprotected heterosexual intercourse are at risk of HIV infection and unwanted pregnancy. Methods We assessed HIV-negative women, aged 15—26 years, who were volunteer participants in a cluster-randomized, controlled HIV prevention trial in the predominantly rural Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

Pregnant Women, Infants, and Children | Gender | HIV by Group | HIV/AIDS | CDC

Testing for HIV in pregnancy enables measures to be taken to reduce the risk of mother-tochild transmission and for the woman to be offered treatment and psychosocial support. Testing for HIV in pregnancy enables measures to be taken to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission and for the woman to be offered treatment and psychosocial support. Human immunodeficiency virus HIV is a blood-borne infection that is initially asymptomatic but involves gradual compromise of immune function, eventually leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome AIDS.

Undiagnosed HIV infection during pregnancy has serious implications for the health of both the woman and her child. Globally, most children with HIV acquire infection through mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, during birth or through breastfeeding Volmink et al These policies are based on the availability of accurate diagnostic tests and effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment in preventing mother-to-child transmission. They also reflect the fact that testing based on risk factors would miss a substantial proportion of women with HIV Chou et al The sensitivities and specificities of various commercial HIV assays can be found at the Therapeutic Goods Administration website.

Cochrane reviews into the effectiveness of interventions in preventing mother-to-child transmission have found that:. In Australia between and , uptake of interventions to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV was high Giles et al Routinely offer and recommend HIV testing at the first antenatal visit as effective interventions are available to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission. A system of clear referral paths ensures that pregnant women who are diagnosed with an HIV infection are managed and treated by the appropriate specialist teams.

Pre- and post-test discussions are an integral part of HIV testing. Providing information and support associated with testing aims to minimise the personal and social impact of HIV infection. Women most at risk of HIV may decline testing Boxhall ; Plitt or may not access testing and available interventions Ferguson et al ; Struik Women who decline testing should be given opportunities to discuss any concerns.

Women who accept testing may experience anxiety while waiting for the initial test result or while waiting for results of repeat testing. Unexpected detection of HIV can result in distress, which is exacerbated in the context of pregnancy. Health professionals delivering the test result should use their best judgement when deciding the most appropriate way to deliver the test result DoHA Rapid tests improve the availability of HIV testing in situations where there is limited access to pathology services and returning for results may be difficult DoHA However, the use of these tests should be limited to situations where DoHA :.

Is there anything wrong with this page? Learn more about it. This is still a work in progress, so please let us know what you think. Menu Search. Home Health topics Initiatives and programs Resources. On this page. Recommendation Grade B 36 Routinely offer and recommend HIV testing at the first antenatal visit as effective interventions are available to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission.

Recommendation Practice point WW A system of clear referral paths ensures that pregnant women who are diagnosed with an HIV infection are managed and treated by the appropriate specialist teams. Previous 32 Hyperglycaemia.

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Hiv infection in pregnancy statistics