Government for sexual health and hiv-

UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

Human papilloma virus HPV vaccines are given as Govdrnment needle. Thank you for your feedback. Accept cookies. Health and care professionals should be aware of the interventions at population level, Disreet sex dates include:. Call this number to speak to a registered nurse about your health concerns. It focuses on increasing testing to reduce undiagnosed infection in people at increased risk of exposure. While we are updating our content, some of the links will take you back to our old website.

Ticklish wives. Find out about our member benefits

This is despite the higher risk of mental health issues the HIV population faces. Read more about a recent listening session. Was this page helpful? Cancel Continue. Added BHIVA Chair, Professor Chloe Orkin: "Despite the stated ambition of policy makers to reduce health inequalities this will not be possible without robustly funded, sustainable services. What can we improve? Phone Israeli dating services within sexuql past 90 days. Access education and training on sexual health topics for doctors, nurses, and other health professionals. More on Campaigns. Explore the topic Health protection Sexual health. Funding cuts have also drastically reduced the output of third sector organisations, such as charities and community groups, who have traditionally helped to plug gaps in services with HIV testing, advice and peer support.

Access to sexual health and HIV services has been dramatically reduced as a result of changes to the funding and organisation of sexual health services since , according to the medical professionals providing care.

  • Our clinics see patients on a first come, first served basis.
  • To implement the PrEP donation program, HHS requires a contractor that can establish and administer a customized solution that gets the drug to eligible recipients under the donation agreement with Gilead.
  • UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work.

UK uses cookies which are essential for the site to work. We also use non-essential cookies to help us improve government digital services. Any data collected is anonymised. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. A Brexit deal has been agreed but needs to be ratified Find out what this means for you.

This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives. Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned. The World Health Organization WHO defines sexual health as a state of physical, emotional, mental and social wellbeing in relation to sexuality - it is not just the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence.

For sexual health to be attained and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled. Most adults are sexually active and good sexual health matters to individuals and communities. Sexual health needs vary according to factors such as age, gender, sexual orientation and ethnicity. However, there are certain core needs common to everyone, including high-quality information and education enabling people to make informed responsible decisions, and access to high-quality services, treatment and interventions.

In England, our definition of sexual, reproductive and human immunodeficiency virus HIV health promotion includes the provision of advice, information, education and services around contraception, sexually transmitted infections STIs , HIV and termination of pregnancy. The document aims to provide the information, evidence base and support tools to enable those involved in sexual health improvement to work together effectively.

Findings from the national surveys of sexual attitudes and lifestyles Natsal show most young people become sexually active and start forming relationships between the ages of 16 and Young people in these age groups have significantly higher rates of poor sexual health, including STIs and abortions, than older people.

Unplanned pregnancy is a key public health indicator. The increasing intervals between first sex, cohabitation, and childbearing means that, on average, women in Britain spend about 30 years of their life needing to avert an unplanned pregnancy. Available evidence shows that around one third of births are unplanned. The report found HIV continues to be concentrated among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men MSM and black African men and women.

It has long been recognised that gonorrhoea and, more recently, mycoplasma genitalium are at risk of becoming untreatable diseases due to the ongoing threat of antimicrobial resistance. Community health and care professionals and providers of specialist services can have an impact by:. Health and care professionals should be aware of the interventions at population level, which include:.

PHE has developed sexual and reproductive health profiles to support local authorities and others to monitor the health of their populations and the contribution of local public health related systems. PHE has also produced guidance to help health professionals including local government, service providers and commissioners understand the sexual health data available across England and how the data can be accessed.

This information provides an overview of the information available on STIs , HIV , contraception, conception and abortion and where to access it. It is divided into indicators used for tracking progress , detailed local information collation and interpretation of local intelligence and national resources tables and reports. As a health and care professional there are a range of reasons why it makes sense to measure your impact and demonstrate the value of your contribution.

This could be about learning and improving your own practice and sharing what has worked well in order to benefit your colleagues and local people or help you with your professional development. The Everyday Interactions Measuring public health impact pathways toolkit provides a quick, straightforward and easy way for health care professionals HCPs to record and measure their public health impact in a uniform and comparable way.

PHE has also developed resources for practitioners to undertake evaluations of interventions or projects in sexual health, reproductive health and HIV services, which will help in measuring outcomes. Sexual and Reproductive health information is provided via the national programme Sexwise commissioned by PHE. Sexual and Reproductive health information for professionals is provided via the national programme Sexwise commissioned by PHE.

They can be used as a reference point for healthcare professionals to inform prioritisation and planning. The Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Framework PHE -LGA provides guidance for local areas on maintaining reductions and narrowing inequalities in under 18 conception rates, with a self-assessment checklist to identify and address gaps. The Framework for supporting teenage mothers and young fathers PHE -LGA sets out the importance of dedicated support for young parents and the contribution of all agencies to a coordinated care pathway.

The Syphilis action plan PHE provides guidance to optimise the four pillars that are essential to syphilis control and prevention: increase testing frequency of high-risk MSM and re-testing of syphilis cases after treatment; deliver partner notification to British Association for Sexual Health and HIV BASHH standards; maintain high antenatal screening coverage and vigilance for syphilis throughout antenatal care; and sustain targeted health promotion.

The aim of the programme is to control chlamydia through early detection and treatment of asymptomatic infection, so reducing onward transmission and the consequences of untreated infection.

Contraceptive services for under 25s PH51 is for NHS and other commissioners, managers and practitioners who have a direct or indirect role in, and responsibility for, contraceptive services. This includes those working in local authorities, education and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors.

It offers best-practice advice for all women of reproductive age who may wish to regulate their fertility using LARC methods. HIV testing: increasing uptake among people who may have undiagnosed HIV NG60 This guidance covers how to increase the uptake of HIV testing in primary and secondary care, specialist sexual health services and the community. It describes how to plan and deliver services that are tailored to the local prevalence of HIV , promote awareness of HIV testing and increase opportunities to offer testing to people who may have undiagnosed HIV.

HIV testing: encouraging uptake QS This quality standard covers interventions to improve the uptake of HIV testing among people who may have undiagnosed HIV. It focuses on increasing testing to reduce undiagnosed infection in people at increased risk of exposure. It describes high-quality care in priority areas for improvement. Sexually transmitted infections and under conceptions: prevention PH3 is guidance is for professionals who are responsible for, or who work in, sexual health services.

This includes general practitioners and professionals working in contraceptive services, genitourinary medicine and school clinics. The aim of this course is to inform professionals so that they can give accurate information and dispel any myths the patient may have heard about contraceptive options. It is not intended to form a comprehensive reference. Module 9 of this free course focuses on sexual and reproductive health and covers:.

The RCGP e-learning is best for the topic of contraception, but the other topics could be very helpful in increasing awareness and confidence of the workforce. This course supports all healthcare professionals to deliver effective contraceptive care. Engaging and interactive, the course features a range of case studies, video content and additional reading resources.

It also includes a discussion forum which enables you to contact your peers also taking the course. Good progress but more to do: teenage pregnancy and young parents. This highlights the importance of a continued focus on teenage pregnancy, the 10 factors for an effective local strategy and examples of case studies illustrating good practice. To help us improve GOV. It will take only 2 minutes to fill in. Skip to main content. Accept cookies. Cookie settings.

Public Health England. Contents Introduction Core principles for healthcare professionals Taking action Understanding local needs Further reading, resources and good practice Free online courses Good practice examples. Introduction The World Health Organization WHO defines sexual health as a state of physical, emotional, mental and social wellbeing in relation to sexuality - it is not just the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity.

Promoting sexual health in your professional practice Findings from the national surveys of sexual attitudes and lifestyles Natsal show most young people become sexually active and start forming relationships between the ages of 16 and Core principles for healthcare professionals Healthcare professionals should: provide a non-judgemental, empathetic approach to sexual health to create a safe and comfortable environment for the patient to discuss their needs know the needs of individuals, communities, and populations related to sexual health, reproductive health and HIV.

A PHE guide to sexual and reproductive health data is available think about the resources and the services available in the health and wellbeing system to promote good sexual and reproductive health understand specific activities or interventions which can prevent poor sexual health, reproductive health and HIV utilise opportunities in different settings to provide sexual health, reproductive health and HIV prevention, diagnosis and treatment Taking action Frontline health and care professionals Health and care professionals can have an impact on an individual level by: reassuring individuals that they are entitled to confidential, non- judgemental access to information and services providing information about the full range of contraceptive methods and promoting prompt access to the method that best suits their needs; see the Sexwise website for downloadable information leaflets.

Measuring impact As a health and care professional there are a range of reasons why it makes sense to measure your impact and demonstrate the value of your contribution. NICE guidance and pathways Contraceptive services for under 25s PH51 is for NHS and other commissioners, managers and practitioners who have a direct or indirect role in, and responsibility for, contraceptive services.

It describes high-quality care in priority areas for improvement Sexually transmitted infections and under conceptions: prevention PH3 is guidance is for professionals who are responsible for, or who work in, sexual health services. Free online courses Contraception eLearning: Royal College of General Practitioners RCGP The aim of this course is to inform professionals so that they can give accurate information and dispel any myths the patient may have heard about contraceptive options.

Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health adolescent health programme Module 9 of this free course focuses on sexual and reproductive health and covers: sexual behaviour in young people sexual assault in young people STIs in young people contraception teenage parents adolescent gynaecology and preventing pregnancy The RCGP e-learning is best for the topic of contraception, but the other topics could be very helpful in increasing awareness and confidence of the workforce.

FSRH online contraception counselling This course supports all healthcare professionals to deliver effective contraceptive care. Is this page useful? Maybe Yes this page is useful No this page is not useful Is there anything wrong with this page? Thank you for your feedback. What were you doing? What went wrong? Email address.

Our survey results provide clear evidence that we need to upgrade, not reduce, services if we are to support and protect vulnerable populations. BHIVA received 98 responses to the survey, 97 of which were from respondents based in England, which are summarised in this press release. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link. Sexual Health. The strategic action plan focusses on four key areas for action, to reduce: incidence of HIV rates of sexually transmitted infections unplanned pregnancies rates of under 16 and under 18 conceptions.

Government for sexual health and hiv. Promoting and Protecting the City's Health

Menu HIV. GOV Search Search. Learn more about this October 15th observance. Share Toggle share menu Facebook Twitter Email. Living with HIV? Find out about treatment, getting connected to HIV care, and the steps you can take to stay healthy. Go to HIV Basics. Find out what the U. Go to Federal Response. Learn how to plan, implement, and measure the use of social media in your HIV work. Go to Digital Tools. Go to Events. Campaigns Many Federal agencies have developed public awareness and education campaigns to address HIV prevention, treatment, care, and research.

Expand All Collapse All Bronx. The number of patients admitted to a clinic depends on provider availability each day. Services are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. On busy days, clinics may stop accepting patients before the posted closure time.

It is especially important to arrive as soon as the clinic opens if you:. For patients without symptoms who want to be tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis or HIV, clinics will usually admit them until the posted closure time. You do not need to fast before coming to a Sexual Health Clinic.

You should eat before your visit, especially if you will be having blood drawn. If you would like to speak to someone about pre-exposure prophylaxis PrEP and you have insurance, bring a copy of your insurance card.

If you are uninsured, you may qualify to receive PrEP medical services and medication through assistance programs. Patient navigators at all of our clinics can help determine if you are eligible for these programs. To help your navigator, bring the following to your visit:.

Also, if you are not working and you are receiving financial support from a friend, relative or spouse, bring a letter verifying you are receiving such support. If you have received services at one of our clinics, please complete our patient satisfaction survey. Your opinion matters! After visiting a clinic, you can get your test results online log-in required , or by calling If you are having trouble trying to get your test results, you can call for assistance.

The Health Department must ask for insurance or payment for services to meet Medicaid standards and other legal requirements. If you want to use your health insurance to pay for the visit, your insurance plan will be billed. A copayment may be required. If you do not have health insurance or do not want your insurance billed for the visit, you will be asked to pay a sliding scale fee based on your family size and yearly income.

You will not be asked for proof of family size or yearly income. No payments will be collected at the clinic. See links below for more details. Health Search all NYC. Menu Promoting and Protecting the City's Health. Expand All Collapse All. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday: a. No doctors will be onsite. Closed on the second Tuesday of each month.

Starting November , clinic will be closed on the last Wednesday of each month and will remain open the second Tuesday of each month. Monday to Thursday: a. Closed on the third Wednesday of each month. Monday to Friday: a. Saturday: a.

Access to sexual health and HIV services has been dramatically reduced as a result of changes to the funding and organisation of sexual health services since , according to the medical professionals providing care. Budgetary pressure means that this demand cannot always be met: more patients are now either turned away or redirected to other parts of the health system. While most were offered the next available appointment, 13 per cent said that patients were referred to another sexual health provider and four per cent that they were redirected to primary care.

Clinicians responding to the survey report that many of the patients who are being turned away have symptoms of potential infection. Both surveys revealed significant reductions in services such as the delivery of HIV prevention activities, outreach to vulnerable populations, cervical cytology and psychosexual health services.

This is of particular concern in the context of a fall in national cervical screening coverage and the higher risk of HPV related cancer in women with HIV. This is despite the higher risk of mental health issues the HIV population faces.

BASHH members gave a mixed response, with 29 per cent of respondents reporting reductions in STI testing in the past year and 27 per cent increased testing. The BHIVA survey showed that it is becoming more difficult for people to test for HIV, with 35 per cent of respondents reporting that there is now reduced access to testing in their own location.

Although some respondents were optimistic about its role in helping to manage the growing demand for services, others expressed concerns about poor implementation, and suggested it was taking the focus away from face-to-face services.

Funding cuts have also drastically reduced the output of third sector organisations, such as charities and community groups, who have traditionally helped to plug gaps in services with HIV testing, advice and peer support. Nearly 40 per cent of BHIVA respondents said that peer support was no longer offered by their service, with 28 per cent of those that still do saying access to it had been reduced. However, provision remains mixed with 28 per cent of BHIVA respondents saying access is improving, 25 per cent saying it had been reduced, and 11 per cent saying PrEP was not currently on offer locally.

Changes since have in many areas led to previously fully integrated clinics that were able to provide a range of services from a single location now being divided between differently funded suppliers. Patients, particularly people living with HIV, may not be willing or able to travel elsewhere and staff may not be able to access records from other services.

Funding cuts have led to staff not being replaced with a knock-on effect to those remaining and to the level of service they can offer. For example, the loss of Health Advisers and nursing staff can limit support for patients.

Respondents to both surveys cited the damaging impact sustained budget cuts were having on staff, as well as the pressures and stresses experienced by retendering, restructuring and the loss of experienced colleagues. Commented BASHH President, Dr Olwen Williams: "Providing high-quality free and open-access care for all those that need it has been the bedrock of sexual health in this country for over a century.

Whilst we are doing our utmost to maintain standards in the face of record demand and dramatic increases in infections, such as syphilis and gonorrhoea in recent years, these surveys clearly show that continued cuts to funding are taking their toll. Current levels of sexual health funding are quite simply not sustainable and the pressures they are generating are having a seriously detrimental impact on the morale and wellbeing of staff.

Without increased support to match the huge growth in demand, the consequences will likely be disastrous for individuals and our public health as a whole. Added BHIVA Chair, Professor Chloe Orkin: "Despite the stated ambition of policy makers to reduce health inequalities this will not be possible without robustly funded, sustainable services.

Our survey results provide clear evidence that we need to upgrade, not reduce, services if we are to support and protect vulnerable populations. We have made huge strides in the control of HIV, so it is particularly worrying to see that important aspects of HIV care, such as access to prevention services, testing and mental health support, have been reduced.

It therefore makes no sense to make it more difficult for people to test, as shown by the reduced access to testing in clinics and outreach locations our members report. This press release summarises the responses provided by those members based in England.

BHIVA received 98 responses to the survey, 97 of which were from respondents based in England, which are summarised in this press release. It has a prime role in education and training, in determining, monitoring and maintaining standards of governance in sexual health and HIV care. BASHH also works to further the advancement of public health in relation to STIs, HIV and other sexual health problems and acts as a champion in promoting good sexual health and providing education to the public.

Since , it has been committed to providing excellent care for people living with and affected by HIV. Its representatives contribute to international, national and local committees dealing with HIV care. It promotes undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education within HIV care. Government funding cuts leave sexual health and HIV care at 'breaking point'.

Reduction in prevention, cytology and mental health services Both surveys revealed significant reductions in services such as the delivery of HIV prevention activities, outreach to vulnerable populations, cervical cytology and psychosexual health services.

Impact of separation of HIV and GUM on staff and services Changes since have in many areas led to previously fully integrated clinics that were able to provide a range of services from a single location now being divided between differently funded suppliers.