Private army iraq-Private military company - Wikipedia

And how did they fare in the aftermath? They started out as a private security firm providing training support to law enforcement, the justice department, and military organizations and received their first contract from the United States government in after the bombing of the USS Cole. In , the private security firm bought a training facility on a dark swamp in North Carolina and officially adopted their name, which was inspired by the murky water surrounding the training facility. The 6,acre training facility contained indoor, outdoor, and urban reproduction shooting ranges, an artificial lake, and a driving track. During the war in Iraq, Blackwater was one of several private security companies use to guard officials, security guards, and military installations, train the Iraqi army and police forces, and provide other support for armed forces.

Private army iraq

Private army iraq

Company literature says that it is the largest training facility in the country. Sunni insurgents celebrate burning a U. Vintage dremel saw company was also linked with a failed attempt to overthrow Colonel Muammar Gaddafi from power in Libya in Just south of Nasiriyah, we stopped for gas. Or just shoot them. I helped raise a new army in Liberia, bought and shipped weapons from eastern Europe to Africa, and shaped the environment in difficult places. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

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All are extensively vetted. I'd had plenty of opportunities to mull this over since getting to Baghdad. With no one watching, it's tempting Private army iraq settle scores. These types of missions — for example, driving Private army iraq supply trucks to and from a base — are less protected Definition of private benefit have routines that can be detected by insurgents. Logistics Technician. Ori Swed studies world polities and organizations in the context of peace and conflict. Candidates must undergo additional retraining to become a park ranger. They are more likely to have a college degree than their active duty counterparts, but less likely than their fellow veterans in the general population. By giving us your email, you are opting in to the Early Bird Brief. There itaq three young Arab men inside.

Former members of the Armed Forces are often at a loss as to what to do when they leave the military.

  • As America readies for withdrawal, the State Department will take over and send more than 5, private security contractors to act as security for diplomats at oversea embassies in Iraq.
  • US Army With huge cutbacks slated for the U.
  • A private military company PMC is a private company providing armed combat or security services for financial gain.
  • The following is a list of notable private military contractors and companies.

About a hundred yards into Iraq, we stopped to pick up weapons. They were unloading the guns onto the trunk of one of their cars as we pulled up. The pile amounted to a small armory: German MP5 submachine guns, AKs newly liberated from the Iraqi army, 9mm Beretta pistols, and dozens of magazines of ammunition.

Just a few feet away, American soldiers stood by the side of the highway directing convoys of fuel trucks heading north. They must have noticed the cluster of men in plain clothes arming themselves with automatic weapons.

They didn't acknowledge it. No one demanded to see our identification or weapons permits. No one even asked what we were doing. By local standards, what we were doing was normal. Only a moron drives to Baghdad unarmed. There were no morons in our convoy. These were American civilian contractors, employees of one of the private security companies the U. The group was led by Kelly McCann, a year-old former marine officer and security expert who also works as an analyst for CNN.

McCann and I have been friendly for a couple of years. When I asked him what exactly civilian contractors were doing in Iraq, a subject about which there has been much speculation but relatively few published facts, he offered to show me. I'd already gotten part of the answer earlier that morning. At a. Apart from me, everyone in the room was working for DynCorp International, an American firm that specializes in high-risk contract work for the Pentagon and the State Department.

Pick an unsafe country and DynCorp is likely to be there. In Colombia, DynCorp pilots fly coca-killing crop dusters slow and low over drug plantations, an integral part of Washington's Plan Colombia. Last spring, DynCorp—along with Kroll Inc. Less than a month after U.

DynCorp set about hiring close to a thousand American cops to move to Iraq and accompany their Iraqi counterparts on the job. So dangerous that DynCorp also had to hire security contractors, many of them veterans of elite special-operations units in the U. I was going to Baghdad with the security contractors. Once we arrived, they'd spend most of their time tightening security around two hotels in the city, the Gardenia and the Baghdad, which housed the American policemen and other DynCorp employees.

Both places were obvious targets for Iraqi insurgents. Both had been attacked repeatedly, the Baghdad Hotel with a devastating suicide bombing a few months before.

Kelly McCann had come to check up on the work his men were doing and to bring them several cases of security and surveillance gear they couldn't get in Iraq. At the moment, though, everyone in the room was focused on simply getting to Baghdad. Commercial flights into the city had been suspended after a series of surface-to-air-missile attacks, one of which blew a chunk of a wing off a DHL cargo plane.

The overland route was now the only option. It wasn't a great option. In the previous three months, at least nine civilian contractors had been killed in the Nasiriyah area alone.

Through which we'd be driving. Hence the briefing. A former Special Forces sergeant named Jack Altizer set his laptop on a coffee table and began a PowerPoint presentation on all the things that could happen to us on the way. He spoke like a man who'd taken dangerous trips before. His language was crisp and technical, like an NTSB spokesman after an airplane crash.

The primary threat, he explained, would come from improvised explosive devices hidden by the side of the road. Typically, an artillery shell, or a series of them daisy-chained together, would be buried under rocks and detonated by remote.

He clicked the mouse and an image appeared on the screen showing the result. It was an aerial shot of the aftermath of a recent ambush. The vehicle, an SUV very much like ours, had been pulverized. Even from a distance, you could see that whoever had been in it must be dead. Not that the attackers took chances. The briefing went on like this for half an hour.

It wasn't clear just who the attackers might be—carjackers, Al Qaeda, Baath Party loyalists, or some combination of the three—only that they had been hurting a lot of Western motorists in recent weeks. Lately there had been reports of attacks from snipers, rocket-propelled grenades, and fixed-place machine guns as well as car-to-car drive-by shootings, ambushes at phony government checkpoints, and hand grenades lobbed through windows in traffic.

And that was just part of what could go wrong on the highway. There was always the possibility that jumpy coalition forces might fire on us, as the 82nd Airborne had done two weeks before to a food-for-oil convoy on the road to Jordan. Small children might run out in front of our vehicle. Or we might simply have a fatal car wreck. The last scenario didn't seem far-fetched. To make the SUVs harder to hit, we'd be traveling fast, between and miles per hour the whole way, including, if possible, through towns.

We'll ram you out of there. With that, he closed his laptop and we were off. I was anxious about the border crossing. Before we'd left the U. I'd never managed to get one. As it turned out, no one cared.

The American soldier standing at the border just nodded at the vehicles and waved us through. We rolled across doing A moment later, we made our pit stop for guns. I was busy scribbling in my notebook when one of Kelly McCann's men, a former marine sniper named Shane Schmidt, walked over with an AK Do you know how this works? I nodded. The week before, Kelly had shown me the basics on his firing range. Designed by the Soviets to be effective in the hands of teenaged peasants, the Kalashnikov is not a complicated weapon.

Schmidt handed the gun to me. Collect your thoughts and shoot back. He stepped back a foot and narrowed his eyes, sizing me up to see if I was the sort of person who might start pulling the trigger indiscriminately once trouble started.

You've got 60 rounds of Iraqi-made ammunition. That's it. Make each one count. Under ordinary circumstances, I would have been reluctant to accept the rifle. I'm not uncomfortable around guns—I've hunted for most of my life—but bringing them on stories is considered taboo. Journalists typically don't carry weapons, even in war zones, for fear of compromising their status as neutral observers. If you're armed, the theory goes, other armed people will consider you a target.

Sounds reasonable, except that in Iraq, journalists are considered targets anyway. Thirteen of them were killed there in All apparently were unarmed. Carrying a gun doesn't make you safe. But it can make you safer. That was enough for me. Less than an hour into the drive, we got the first sign that someone was watching us.

Jack Altizer had already picked up transmissions on his surveillance gear indicating that two people nearby were communicating on walkie-talkies.

It looked like the classic setup to a carjacking: spotter by the side of the road sees Westerners in a convoy; gunmen in a chase vehicle pull up alongside and force them off the road. Or just shoot them. Kelly and I were talking about the approaching pickup when suddenly it appeared right next to us.

There were three young Arab men inside. They were inches away from our driver's-side window, maintaining our speed and giving us hard looks. Kelly's voice never changed its tone. He raised his MP5 off his lap, extended it across Bill's chest, and pointed the muzzle at the men in the pickup.

They hit the brakes hard, disappearing into our rearview mirror. Bill never took his eyes off the road. Kelly kept up the conversation as though nothing had happened. Just south of Nasiriyah, we stopped for gas. Despite having one of the world's largest oil reserves, Iraq has relatively few filling stations.

There were no morons in our convoy. Both gas stations we passed were closed. We were outnumbered and had only a handgun; there wasn't much to do but leave. I didn't want to hurt another person. The Spectator. Fear of missing out?

Private army iraq

Private army iraq

Private army iraq

Private army iraq

Private army iraq. Unity Resources Group is active in the Middle East, Africa, the Americas and Asia

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Academi - Wikipedia

And how did they fare in the aftermath? They started out as a private security firm providing training support to law enforcement, the justice department, and military organizations and received their first contract from the United States government in after the bombing of the USS Cole.

In , the private security firm bought a training facility on a dark swamp in North Carolina and officially adopted their name, which was inspired by the murky water surrounding the training facility. The 6,acre training facility contained indoor, outdoor, and urban reproduction shooting ranges, an artificial lake, and a driving track. During the war in Iraq, Blackwater was one of several private security companies use to guard officials, security guards, and military installations, train the Iraqi army and police forces, and provide other support for armed forces.

In , they were one of three services brought in for protective services in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, and Israel. They continued to do work for the government back home in the US, too, specifically during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In fact, they sent in a rescue team and a helicopter free of charge to help with relief efforts. Then, in the spring of , Blackwater was one of three companies awarded a contract to provide diplomatic security in Iraq.

One of their jobs was to protect the US Embassy there. At this time, because it was a privately owned company, little was known about the internal affairs of the business. Another training facility was acquired in fall of in Mount Carroll, Illinois, just west of Chicago.

They also attempted to build a facility near San Diego but were met with a lot of resistance from local citizens and government. The company eventually withdrew the application for this facility in On September 16, , a group of Blackwater contractors tasked with guarding State Department employees opened fire on a small car driven by a couple with their child in tow.

Employees claimed they were attacked first while other witnesses say that the contractors opened fire because the car would not get out of the way of the convoy. Iraqi police and other Blackwater forces also got involved in the gunfight.

In all, 20 Iraqi civilians were reported killed. The US and Iraqi governments both investigated and their stories about what happened have never agreed.

This incident sparked a national interest in the number of private forces being used in Iraq and brought up issues of legality, accountability, and oversight. In , a census found that there were as many private contractors in Iraq as there were members of the military and that figure is believed to be an underestimate. The major issue: privately contracted security has different goals than the military.

To be clear, the issues and questions that arose regarding the use of private forces in Iraq and the cost both morally and financially of doing business this way is not limited to Blackwater.

There are several firms that were there right alongside them, but the incident that brought all of these questions to the surface was one that involved Blackwater.

But Blackwater did have its fair share of incidents. On Christmas Eve , a drunken Blackwater employee got into an argument with an Iraqi guard and shot him dead. He was quickly evacuated from the country. More shootings of Iraqi citizens were reported in May , which led to an armed standoff. This did not sit well with the Iraqis or citizens of the Middle East generally and led to a lot of problems that otherwise could have been avoided.

They refused any interviews and took their website offline. When they did release a statement, it was brief, targeted for only the US, and stuck to their story that they were initially fired upon by armed enemies. In , Blackwater announced that it would start to focus its services away from security contracting because of the risks involved. One of the things it added is an ethics program. The next month, founder and CEO Erik Prince stepped down and in December of that same year, he stopped any involvement in day to day operations.

Xe was bought by a group of investors who built a new company, Academi, and then in merged with another firm to form Constellis Holdings. They still do business as Academi. Today, the North Carolina training center operates as United States Training Center, or USTC, and carries out tactics and weapons training for military, government, and law enforcement. They also offer courses in tactical driving, hand to hand combat, and precision rifle marksmanship. Academi also offers a lot of other services, like maritime training, canine training for explosive and drug detection.

After the departure of Erik Prince from his former company, Prince stayed active in private military interests around the world.

He was hired by the crown prince of Abu Dhabi and moved to Abu Dhabi in On a separate front, he oversaw recruitment for private military companies, such as Executive Outcomes which is a former South African private military firm that gained fame when they were hired by several African governments during the s to defeat violent rebellions in addition to protecting oil and diamond reserves. This program was funded by several Arab countries, including the United Arab Emirates and was backed by the United States.

He commissioned the company to modify Thrush G crop-dusters with surveillance equipment, machine guns, armor, and other weapons, including custom pylons that were capable of mounting either NATO or Russian ballistics. Frontier Services Group owns two of the modified Thrush Gs, but since executives learned the craft had been weaponized by Prince, the company has declined to sell or use the aircraft to avoid violating U. Hats off to you guys for applying your expertise to serve others!

I had worked with a U. I speak Arabic Iraqi Dialect and English. You must be logged in to post a comment. Government Contracts During the war in Iraq, Blackwater was one of several private security companies use to guard officials, security guards, and military installations, train the Iraqi army and police forces, and provide other support for armed forces. Expansion Another training facility was acquired in fall of in Mount Carroll, Illinois, just west of Chicago.

They were widely reported at the time. Moving Forward with the Legacy Company In , Blackwater announced that it would start to focus its services away from security contracting because of the risks involved.

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Private army iraq