Robert pinsky eros against esperana-Esa cosa con plumas, la esperanza (Emily Dickinson) | zaidenwerg

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Robert pinsky eros against esperana

Robert pinsky eros against esperana

Robert pinsky eros against esperana

Robert pinsky eros against esperana

Robert pinsky eros against esperana

What if this is the end of the world, I thought. He served in the Army from to in Alaska with the modern winter biathlon sros, where he obtained two years of intense training and the experience of international. Think about silence. She has studied and worked in Brazil, Chile, and France and has traveled extensively throughout Spain and Latin America. Here is the superiority of the animal. Polyamory tulsa on about the Dr.

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This guy is saying there are three processes of the optical nerve; they are called this and this and this. She had to let it shit and pee and be a dog. Is it a Freudian typo? English Choose a language for shopping. Some things are too Most popular lube because they are too predictable. Show details. Mindwheel is about the need to find a secret that civilization desperately needs. It is a simple, accesible beauty that Pinksy strives for and delivers, many of his poems Robert pinsky eros against esperana on contemporary themes and keeping their lexicon to the modern. Amazon Drive Cloud storage from Amazon. Some of us can have a drawing implement, and the wing chair in front of us, and good light on it; yet in an hour and half we cannot reproduce an image that looks much like a wing chair. I think I get bored much more easily than other people. But choosing the most satisfying is not how I think. You finally get a shape to it. What kept his eyes from giving back the gaze Was the lamp tilted near them in his hand.

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To browse Academia. Skip to main content. You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. Log In Sign Up. Bennett Bonilla.

Fox: Some people see poetry as a search for truth. Do you? The author has the right to reprint or republish the article, or any portion thereof, in any book or article that the author may write or contribute to. Loom Press P. Box Lowell, Massachusetts editor loompress. Siglo XXI. Twenty-first century. Its arms imitate branches, but they are withered branches, which, for having misunderstood their true function to embrace life , have fallen down along the trunk, have dried up: mankind does not blossom at all.

But one man is the salvation of humanity, one man puts humanity back in the universal concert, one man unites the human flowering with universal flower- ring; ii —Reader, book.

This book, like a body of sculpted clay, is formed-matter—or hyle— matter formed from prose, lines, pulp, sentences, layout, ideas, titles, numbers, book glue, symbols, poems—the pause—white space an inarticulate form. The inverted triangle, or , is used in this book to refer to the triadic relation of the angel, muse, duende. Angel is a vertical orientation, muse is a lateral orientation, and duende calls up from the deep, and is the oscillation, the fight, the dance that activates the poem, and makes of man a tree: with arms thrown laterally, roots thrust deep into the ground, the poet.

This book is organized into seven sections, or s. And, as a possible example of a third way external-internal I offer the immutable Lorca fighting to the death with his duende. The poems in this section take up themes of war, love-making and -unmaking, inspiration, loss of faith, life, origin, fate, our survival, complicity, escape, refuge, and trees. One where we must call up duende from below , call on angel from above and call over to our muse to our left and to our right , to fight within us, to come down to us, to stand with us as we sing, chant, fall.

This is what it means for poetry to be both celebration and confrontation. It must perform these acts simultaneously.

Not one without the other. But in order for the song to have its effect, it must resonate with the body politic. For some short period, the collective song resonates within them.

Look to your poets, readers. Try to understand this simple speech as I would be ashamed of another. I swear, there is in me no wizardry of words. I speak to you with silence like a cloud or a tree.

What strengthened me, for you was lethal. You mixed up farewell to an epoch with the beginning of a new one, Inspiration of hatred with lyrical beauty; Blind force with accomplished shape. Here is a valley of shallow Polish rivers. And an immense bridge Going into white fog. Here is a broken city; And the wind throws the screams of gulls on your grave When I am talking with you.

What is poetry which does not save Nations or people? A connivance with official lies, A song of drunkards whose throats will be cut in a moment, Readings for sophomore girls. That I wanted good poetry without knowing it, That I discovered, late, its salutary aim, In this and only this I find salvation. They used to pour millet on graves or poppy seeds To feed the dead who would come disguised as birds.

I put this book here for you, who once lived So that you should visit us no more. Tout le possible. Tous les flux, tous les rayons. Tout attend. Je dis tout. Il est univers. Abandon joyeux. Et la fleur est le signe de cette reconnaissance. What presides over the poem is not the most lucid intelligence, or the most acute sensibility, but an entire experience: all the women loved, all the desires experienced, all the dreams dreamed, all the images received or grasped, the whole weight of the body, the whole weight of the mind.

All lived experience. All the possibility. Around the poem about to be made, the precious vortex: the ego, the id, the world. And the most extraordinary contacts: all the pasts, all the futures the anticyclone builds its plateaux, the amoeba loses its pseudopods, vanished vegetations meet. All the flux, all the rays. The body is no longer deaf or blind.

Everything has a right to live. Everything is summoned. Everything awaits. Everything, I say. The individual whole churned up by poetic inspiration. And, in a more disturbing way, the cosmic whole as well. This is the right occasion to recall that the unconscious that all true poetry calls upon is the receptacle of original relationships that bind us to nature. Within us, all the ages of mankind.

Within us, all human kind. Within us, animal, vegetable, mineral. Mankind is not only mankind. It is universe. Everything happens as though, prior to the secondary scattering of life, there was a knotty primal unity whose gleam poets have homed in on. Mankind, distracted by its activities, delighted by what is useful, has lost the sense of that fraternity.

Here is the superiority of the animal. And because the tree is stability, it is also surrender. Joyous surrender. And the flower is the sign of that recognition. The superiority of the tree over mankind, of the tree that says yes over mankind who says no. Superiority of the tree that is consent over mankind who is evasiveness; superiority of the tree, which is rootedness and deepening, over mankind who is agitation and malfeasance.

And that is why mankind does not blossom at all. Mankind is no tree. But one man is the salvation of humanity, one man puts humanity back in the universal concert, one man unites the human flowering with universal flowering; that man is the poet. La musa dicta, y, en algunas ocasiones, sopla. La verdadera lucha es con el duende. This distinction is fundamental, at the very root of the work. The angel guides and gives like Saint Raphael, defends and avoids like Saint Michael, announces and forwards like Saint Gabriel.

The angel on the road to Damascus, and the one that came through the crack of the little balcony of Assisi, and the one who tracked Heinrich Suso are all ordering, and it is useless to resist their lights, for they beat their steel wings in an atmosphere of predestination.

The muse dictates and sometimes prompts. She can do relatively little, for she is distant and so tired I saw her twice that one would have to give her half a heart of marble.

Poets who have muses hear voices and do not know where they are coming from. They come from the muse that encourages them and sometimes snacks on them, as happened to Apollinaire, a great poet destroyed by the horrible muse who appears with him in a certain painting by the divine, angelic Rousseau. The muse awakens the intelligence, bringing a landscape of columns and a false taste of laurel. But intelligence is often the enemy of poetry, because it limits too much, and it elevates the poet to a sharp-eyed throne where he forgets that ants could eat him or that a great arsenic lobster could fall suddenly on his head—things against which the muses that live in monocles and in the lukewarm, lacquered roses of tiny salons are quite helpless.

The muse and angel come from outside us: the angel gives lights, and the muse gives forms Hesiod learned from her. Loaf of gold or tunic fold: the poet receives norms in his grove of Laurel. But one must awaken the duende in the remotest mansions of the blood. And reject the angel, and give the muse a kick in the seat of the pants, and conquer our fear of the violet smile exhaled by eighteenth-century poetry, and of the great telescope in whose lens the muse, sickened by limits, is sleeping.

The true fight is with the duende. Why should the world be over-wise, In counting all our tears and sighs? We smile, but, O great Christ, our cries To thee from tortured souls arise. Then rest at cool evening Beneath a tall tree While night comes on gently, Dark like me— That is my dream! To fling my arms wide In the face of the sun, Dance! Till the quick day is done. Rest at pale evening.

Get to Know Us. Most things people enjoy are difficult. Poetry is like that—it's part of us. Don't have a Kindle? Thank you very much, Robert. An art. The animal loves difficulty.

Robert pinsky eros against esperana

Robert pinsky eros against esperana

Robert pinsky eros against esperana. How can poetry that doesn't rhyme be so pleasing to the ear?

I did write a little book called The Sounds of Poetry. It's very much written for people who are serious, even fanatical, about that subject. If you just want to learn scansion or the names of metrical feet, it is not the book for you. My shortest advice would be to find poems you love and say them over and over again. That's the best assignment I gave, possibly the most useful thing I do as a teacher of writing or reading: to type out with your own hands some poems you love, let's say 35 pages.

And I don't judge the content. It could be nursery rhymes, something your mom read to you, song lyrics. The only rule is not to include anything you wrote. Students sometimes tell me they learn more from this exercise than anything else. Of course, when you type a poem, you're memorizing it three or four or five words at a time. Then you can think about these questions: What is the typographical error I just made?

Is it a Freudian typo? Which is better, typo or original? Why is it better? Or is my version better? And you have it. You have the anthology you have typed to look back at. The idea is not original.

My wife gave this same assignment when she taught 8th grade English. I've done it with peers, with students at the University of California, Berkeley. Here is another, related suggestion—read aloud. And when you get to the end of the line and the grammar doesn't stop, then your voice should not stop. If there is tension between the grammar going on and the line trying to stop it, your voice should acknowledge that tension.

Reading aloud is part of the format you use in your creative writing classes at Boston University? Yes, the first thing we do is hear the poem, sometimes in both the author's voice and someone else's. And I always tell my students I want them to have something by heart at all times.

Periodically, I will ask, "Do you have a poem for us you want to do by heart? Why are you so devoted as a critic? Oh, that one hurts, Joel! Yes, I have heard I have more than seven personalities. A book like this, Sounds of Poetry , I wanted to write about the physical nature of poetry.

People often talk darkly about quantity or duration, for example, as though it's some kind of arcane mystery you can't understand. Pitch seems to be another one of those mysteries. Yet, we use pitch all the time, and we can hear quantity quite well. I want to dignify and illuminate some of these essential aspects of poetry as an art. When I wrote The Situation of Poetry , in the early 70s, I was irritated with the accepted discourse about poetry.

Sure, I had always liked poetry and would write it. My goal was to modify that accepted discourse and maybe make it more helpful. What role should academic criticism play in affecting the accessibility of poetry to the public at large? I don't know, and it's a question that I have not dealt with. My Favorite Poem Project is an attempt to deal with the presence of poetry in people's lives—and their acceptance of poetry independent of academic criticism.

The truth is, I have never read many of the scholarly works about poetry. And the books we're talking about, the ones I have written, are not scholarly books exactly.

I suppose you could argue that academic criticism, in many ways, is the most useful to professional poets. If there's a lot of information you want, or new ways of thinking, some work of scholarship might be wonderful—opening new possibilities. But, I don't have a lot to say about academic criticism of poetry. It's never been any big concern of mine. You make the observation that "all good art deflects the predictable. I think people go into poetry, I hope, because they get bored easily—and real poetry is the opposite of boredom because it is fast and fresh.

People say poetry is hard to understand. That's only one of the good things about it. If there's a cop show on television, you understand it before you have seen it.

Some things are too easy because they are too predictable. Most things people enjoy are difficult. That's why kids love video games. Their games are difficult. The animal loves difficulty. If people make a lot of money and are successful, you'll find them out on the golf course—because it's difficult.

And I think I've mentioned boredom already. I think I get bored much more easily than other people. And one of the things I like about poems is that they're always upsetting your expectations.

When you talk about the social responsibilities of poets, you say that they should feel utterly free and yet must be answerable. How do you manage that apparent contradiction? Well, maybe that paradox occurs whenever you try to create a work of art. When you begin, whether you're one of these or year old people in this room or me at 60, the paper is equally blank. You also are equally free. You should feel you are able to use in your poem any swear word or personal information or political position.

You're free in that sense. You do the thing you are free to do, but then you respond. This is true of art but also maybe of many things in life—you are free, but you use your freedom to respond, in a way that is answerable. Talking about writing poetry and being answerable, Keats observed that "if poetry doesn't come as naturally as the leaves on a tree, it had better not come at all. I think he meant something very much like what I said about why Ben Jonson is so great—he wrote verse the way some other, differently gifted person might sing or throw a ball.

The way a tree makes leaves. There are people who really like to think about the sounds of words. But there are thousands of people who don't care about thinking about the sounds of words. Some people get into the rhythms of the vowels and consonants.

There's some thing that we are naturally curious about; there's some obsession with physical materials. Some of us can look at a wing chair and then look away and make a pretty good drawing. Some will look at it and study it. Some of us can have a drawing implement, and the wing chair in front of us, and good light on it; yet in an hour and half we cannot reproduce an image that looks much like a wing chair. Is it learned? Is it something you acquire when you are an infant? Is it something that's in your genetic makeup?

I don't know. There's something to what Keats says; if you try to will it, maybe you can awaken something, but it certainly is very difficult. More likely, it is in you as the leaves are in the seed that becomes a tree. Though unlike the tree we can study, we cultivate our gift. I remember Mr. Winthrop, our old tyrannical teacher who taught music for several generations in Long Branch, New Jersey.

His nationality was German. When the 7th graders came in, he hummed a couple of notes using a mouthpiece. Then, he asked me to hum the notes back to him, giving me the mouthpiece.

I learned to play the clarinet because when I hummed with the mouthpiece it made a sound. Winthrop's system. He'd give you a mouthpiece, and you'd make a noise with it, and you'd be in the band. And if you couldn't make a noise, you were out.

In your writings you talk about physical grace, lively social texture and inward revelation. Is that a standard that you hold for yourself as you write new verse? It's more than a standard. I can't get excited and I can't get on with doing it until it has physical grace. I can have an idea for a poem, or a thought, or a feeling.

I can have it for weeks or months or years. But I'm not writing a poem until it's doing something to me—until my heart aches. A thrilling difficulty. This heartache drowns me in the pain that I love. It's like doodling at the piano or playing with clay. You finally get a shape to it. So, the physical reaction is real and tangible, not just an abstract expectation. I guess what I mean by lively social texture is that even if I haven't written a particular poem, I'd still define it as interesting, the way gossip or anger or comedies are suppressed.

If you hear voices through a locked door and you can't make out what they are saying, sometimes you can tell if it's interesting or not, passionate or not. It can't be measured, but if it's there, it sounds graceful, maybe even revelatory.

In what ways can poetry serve the role of transforming and shaping social needs and sustaining cultural traditions? Whitman wrote praises and songs that opened up lots of human endeavors that were not "poetic"—not courtly matters or devotional matters. He showed us that these experiences can be celebrated and lyrical. Frank O'Hara maybe does something comparable with his way of celebrating a gay man's experience of New York City, 20th century culture, technology, etc.

William Carlos Williams looks across the way, at roofers who are having lunch, and one of them… let me read you one of his poems for an example of what I'm talking about. It's titled "Fine Work with Pitch and Copper": Now they are resting In the fleckless light separately in unison like the sacks of sifted stone stacked regularly by twos above the flat roof ready after lunch to be opened and strewn The copper in eight Foot strips has been Beaten lengthwise Down the center at right Angles and lies ready To edge the coping.

There's something about that noun "coping" and the participle "chewing" at the ends of two lines, then "picks up a copper strip and runs his eye along it" that speaks to us.

It is what the poet has done: he has run his eye along the scene of the roofers. There's something really nice about that.

He shows us what is worth noticing. It's got all kinds of human intelligence and measure and organization: the copper in eight foot strips that has been beaten lengthwise at a right angle. It is all beautiful to see and say. The poet conveys the cultural or social information, "I have the things I know and I love, and that's why I encourage you to do the same. Or can it? I said that not without irony or reservation about mass media, but with respect as well.

I think that video and music and computer graphics can be spectacular, beautiful, gorgeous. They are on a mass scale, but that is not to say that they can't be great works of art. Buster Keaton is a mass artist, so is Miguel Antor.

They are great, great artists and performers. Poetry is in certain ways the medium of the individual, the opposite of performance.

I don't write for me to perform. I don't write for an actor; I write for your voice. That's my metier's glory. Vincent Millay's " Interim ". Robert Frost's " Directive ," one of his greatest and most ambitious poems, is in blank verse. Both poems use old age to exemplify something about consciousness itself: that it is only partial, defined by the immense absences that surround it.

The ice and snow along the walls of the house, the interrupted nap, contrast with the alert or alerted mind, its conscious waking and keeping. In both poems, sleep and darkness give consciousness a shape and, therefore, meaning. The two poets—more similar, I think, than literary categorizing might make them seem—were both relatively young when they published these poems, in which being old evokes the nature of mind itself: Williams 33 in , Frost 47 in In keeping with my technical theme, both poems are rich in like sounds, certainly richer than many a merely competent poem in end rhyme.

For example, in the first couple of sentences in Frost's poem, there's an intricate, expressive dance of the consonants and vowels in eyes, gaze, was , and age. In the sentence beginning "A light he was to no one but himself," the phrases with their varying lengths all end with a T sound: sat, what, light, that.

Williams, as it happens, also lets the vowel of age chime with another word: glaze , which has the same end consonant sound as trees. Later, broken shares a vowel with snow and a consonant with covered and seedhusks —well, it's clumsy work, trying to trace these audible subtleties. Old age is a flight of small cheeping birds skimming bare trees above a snow glaze.

Gaining and failing they are buffeted by a dark wind— But what? On harsh weedstalks the flock has rested, the snow is covered with broken seedhusks and the wind tempered by a shrill piping of plenty.

What kept his eyes from giving back the gaze Was the lamp tilted near them in his hand. What kept him from remembering what it was That brought him to that creaking room was age. He stood with barrels round him—at a loss. And having scared the cellar under him In clomping here, he scared it once again In clomping off—and scared the outer night, Which has its sounds, familiar, like the roar Of trees and crack of branches, common things, But nothing so like beating on a box.

A light he was to no one but himself Where now he sat, concerned with he knew what, A quiet light, and then not even that. The log that shifted with a jolt Once in the stove, disturbed him and he shifted, And eased his heavy breathing, but still slept.

Households that receive more than one Andover magazine are encouraged to call to discontinue extra copies. Sykes Wellness Center was dedicated May 6. Sykes, who left PA in to head the Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation, wore numerous hats during her year tenure at Andover, from college counselor to residential dean to dean of Community and Multicultural Development.

With characteristic graciousness, she thanked the many supporters who made the Sykes Wellness Center possible; she also teared up when noting that it was the first building on campus named for an African American woman. Even the naming of the wellness center is a privilege I know I will spend the rest of my life working to earn.

Born and raised in Birmingham, Ala. As an athlete, Dorothy competed fiercely in volleyball having an undefeated season her senior year , captained the softball team, and cheered wildly as a Blue Key. She has been a PA alumni admission representative for three years. To learn more about making an annual gift to Phillips Academy, please contact Stephen Rodriguez, director of annual giving, at or srodriguez andover.

Fuess Award. The class of retiring faculty members features six individuals whose impact reaches far beyond Andover Hill. Twenty years later, the center continues to provide crucial programming, research, and discussions about this important topic.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. How can you measure the effectiveness of a teacher?

Strong test scores? A waiting list for classes? Consistently receiving five stars on ratemyteachers. Countless hours have been spent studying the topic of teacher assessments and there are many views. Teaching, said Bardo, is a profession that provides delayed gratification. Beginning on page 26, we profile these remarkable individuals and share personal stories of gratitude from their former students.

Alumni recall meeting with counselor Max Alovisetti at difficult times and cite their appreciation for his calm and positive manner. Chris Walter is celebrated for his deep knowledge and love of music, while Steve Carter had a hand in almost every teaching, athletic, and administrative function during his 36 years at Andover. As you all know, Andover is very challenging.

Add to that academic rigor the difficulties of living away from home and the dramatic swells of adolescence, and sometimes it can feel downright impossible. That is why the relationships formed with adults on campus are so critically important. Faculty here are teachers first, but as these stories show, they are so much more.

Main PA phone: Changes of address and death notices: alumni-records andover. Periodicals postage paid at Andover MA and additional mailing offices. Content Created with Alumni in Mind Andover has always been known for innovation—in its curriculum, its pedagogy, and in its graduates.

That is why we are looking to you, our alumni, to help us identify the next chapter of Andover magazine. In this spirit of innovation, we are looking to provide PA alums with the most exciting news and information about Andover, delivered in the best format. And what better way to understand your wants and needs than to ask you? The survey also will be e-mailed to alumni. No need to take the survey twice; please use whichever format you are most comfortable with.

The results of this survey will be used to guide our decisions as we seek to identify and deliver the best content. We look forward to your responses. Read more on page Photo by Gil Talbot. To the editor: I read with interest the articles in each issue of the magazine and continue to be amazed by the activities and programs offered to the students and very impressed by the accomplishments and lives of the alumni.

Maybe it started back around , when balsa models were rapidly phased out and replaced with plastic models that re-created every last detail. The magic of transforming delicate pieces of die-cut wood and paper into objects that, with some visual forgiveness, represented the awesome gadgets operated by big people was replaced by a different kind of magic—something that provided greater detail than anything that could be approximated with wood, paper, and glue but obscured the underlying physics of structure.

The only tiny note that caught my eye was the story on the musical Hairspray. Things do change! It would have been nice to have been presented with examples of social, economic, or environmental issues students have determined can be effectively addressed with the technology at hand. It would have been instructive to learn how a project is actually taken from concept to application.

I just returned from the Abbot campus, where I spent a wonderful day with classmates, other Abbot alums, and present PA students as we participated in the program honoring the 20th anniversary of the Brace Center for Gender Studies.

Gender equality continues to be a much-discussed topic. I felt that there could have been more written about her time at PA, her accomplishments, and her background, giving her the same attention her well-accomplished [male] schoolmates received. There is no theory offered and little said about actual content.

You may have encountered this osseous personage rumored to have been pals with George, the resident ghost in the old Isham Health Center. He or she is likely enjoying brighter days in the new Rebecca M. Sykes Wellness Center. Letters to the Editor Policy Andover magazine welcomes letters of words or fewer from members of the Andover community addressing topics that have been discussed in the magazine.

Letters will be edited for clarity, length, and civility. Opinions expressed in the Letters to the Editor section do not necessarily represent the viewpoints of the editorial staff or of Phillips Academy. Take Back The Night TBTN , a nationwide movement to heighten awareness and empower survivors, has been observed for decades at colleges and universities, but this year was different.

Guided by Drs. Flavia Vidal and Tasha Hawthorne, codirectors of the Brace Center for Gender Studies, Andover was the only secondary school to take part on this night. Hundreds of students, faculty, and staff turned out for the event. Led by candlelight, they marched from Sam Phil to the Abbot Circle.

They read poetry and cited statistics that tell us there is still much work to be done to make our campuses and communities free from sexual violence. Some students have even had their work published.

When Mrs. Ogilvie made a generous gift to establish the center in , she sought to honor the history of Abbot Academy in a forward-leaning way. Although she was already a tenacious advocate for girls on our campus and across the country, it was important to her that this new center welcome all and not serve exclusively as an enclave for girls and women.

We applaud that prescient thinking today, especially as we consider the many complex issues facing schools, our states, and our nation. Debates surrounding gender identity, limitations of the gender binary, the importance of Title IX beyond sports, and the pressures of masculinity facing teenage boys are just a few examples.

TBTN is just one of the many initiatives—faculty research, student scholarship, and peer-school conferences are a few others—that demonstrate the serious and important work supported We lost Donna Brace Ogilvie last fall at the age of As we by the Brace Center.

Standing up and standing out is exactly what celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Brace Center this year, her the center has done for two decades. In its current iteration, it exlegacy shines brightly—across gender lines.

Non Sibi Weekend As part of another successful Non Sibi Weekend in April, hundreds of students, faculty, staff, and alumni took part in community outreach efforts on campus and around the globe. Although Non Sibi Weekend constitutes a very important annual event, community engagement, says Cueto-Potts, is truly a meaningful year-round effort for many at Andover.

At the winter meeting of the Board of Trustees, five faculty members were awarded instructorships and foundations. Allis Jr. Bancroft Foundation. Congratulations to all! Summer Session, which welcomes both boarding and day students, is. Friedman most recently was senior project manager at SchoolWorks, an educational consulting company that has worked with clients such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the New York State Education Department. She also held the positions of assistant dean of admission and assistant dean of preparation and placement at The Steppingstone Foundation in Boston.

Summertime, and the campus is busy Andover students—and many faculty—may be off pursuing other adventures, but campus does not sit idle during the summer months. Summer at the Addison Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of the American Television Through July 31 Avant-garde art shaped the look and content of American television in its formative years, from the s through the mids, and in turn, television introduced the public to the latest trends in art and design.

Presenting more than art objects and clips, Revolution of the Eye investigates how artists fascinated with this brash new medium and its technological possibilities contributed to network programs and design campaigns; appeared on television to promote modern art; and explored, critiqued, or absorbed the new medium in their work.

Batman and Robin, As containers for living, the forms that the house and the home take are as varied as the human desires they hold. Beauty, grace, color, and harmony filled Tang Theatre in late February, when the theatre and dance department, in collaboration with the music department, presented an evening of contemporary dance featuring members of the Andover Dance Group and the Academy Chamber Orchestra.

Rarely has a racquet caused such a racket. At exactly p. The annual surprise day off from classes is greeted with excitement by students and recalled with much affection by alumni. As she began her April 8 presentation in the full-to-capacity Cochran Chapel, Dr. He married the wrong Jane! She explored some of the major issues raised by social media, including privacy and online cruelty. Her visit also included a lunchtime conversation with students.

A professor in the English department at Boston University and former U. Editor, professor, blogger, and author Roxane Gay received wide acclaim for her debut novel, An Untamed State. In her work and her March 24 talk on campus, Gay discussed the multiplicity of identities and themes in pop culture. The war on terror and the presidential election were among the topics addressed by Moustafa Bayoumi, author of This Muslim American Life, during his March 31 visit to PA. Being Young and Arab in America.

Robert pinsky eros against esperana